Call for Papers
"Growing Up in Rural America" Call for Articles for Russell Sage Foundation Journal of Social Sciences
Monday, August 19, 2019 10:15 AM

There is a recently opened request for articles for a Russell Sage Foundation Journal issue on Growing Up in Rural America, which may be of interest to CRENET members.

The issue will feature original qualitative and quantitative research that focuses on four key life domains: family dynamics, education, economic security, and health.

They are particularly (but not exclusively) interested in studies that expand our current knowledge by 1) examining the links between specific rural contextual characteristics and the wellbeing of children and youth and/or 2) assessing the cumulative or longer-term outcomes for those born and raised in rural areas. They also invite studies that provide a synthesis of person- and place-based policies designed to improve outcomes for rural youths. They encourage proposals from a range of social sciences including economics, education, demography, geography, public health, social work, and sociology.

The complete request for articles is found at: http://www.russellsage.org/publications/request-articles-growing-rural-america

Please direct any inquiries about this call to Russell Sage Foundation at [email protected]

Note that a short abstract (2-pages) is due by Sept. 26.
 
Engineering Studies - Special Issue
Monday, June 24, 2019 09:37 AM

Engineering Studies is an interdisciplinary journal devoted to the scholarly study of engineers and engineering. It advances analysis (historical, social, cultural, political, philosophical, and organizational) which enhances critical understanding of engineering education, research, practice, policy, and representation.

Engineering Studies involves critical investigation in the practices under study (work, design, formation, or service to society); it does not publish papers that seek only to improve the effectiveness of engineering. Prospective authors are invited to reflect on and anticipate how their work might prove helpful to the academy and beyond.

Engineering Studies warmly welcome prospective authors to submit their contributions to a special issue dedicated to New engineering actors and practices in agriculture. The study of engineers and engineering generally focuses on product design, infrastructure (transport, water, energy, telecommunication), and particular industries such as aerospace, energy, and computing – but rarely agriculture, except in field-specific journals. However, engineers and engineering are deeply engaged with agriculture, food and rural communities. This special issue seeks to shed some light on engineers involved in agriculture: who they are, what are their relations to other actors, and what are their practices.

For more information, click here.

 
Call for Papers: SfAA
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 09:42 AM
The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) invites abstracts (sessions, papers and posters) for the Program of the 80th Annual Meeting in Albuquerque, NM, March 17-21, 2020. The theme of the Program is “Cultural Citizenship and Diversity in Complex Societies.”

The Society is a multi-disciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution.  We welcome papers from all disciplines.  The deadline for abstract submission is October 15, 2019.  For additional information on the theme, abstract size/format, and the meeting, please visit our web page (www.sfaa.net/annual-meeting/).
 
Call for Papers: HJSR Special Issue 42: California Genocide and Healing
Monday, June 10, 2019 11:39 AM

 

The Humboldt Journal of Social Relations (HJSR) invites paper submissions for the 2020 Special Issue 42: California Genocide and Healing. For this issue of HJSR, we are interested in exploring acts of genocide and mass atrocity, and the processes of healing that have been initiated in both native and non-native communities. We seek work that evaluates acts of genocide and mass atrocity in California, long-term ramifications, impacts on culture and society, acts of memorialization and reconciliation, and the relatively slow pace or reluctance of the State to acknowledge and respond to its history.  The submission deadline is October 31, 2019, and manuscripts should be in 12-point font, double-spaced and generally not exceed 8500 words. Commentaries and creative writing should not exceed 3000 words.

 

In 1979, When Our Worlds Cried: Genocide in Northwestern California by Jack Norton (Hupa/Cherokee) was published, it was one of the few monographs that centered on California Indian genocide. Norton’s work set the stage for future research by historians, sociologists, anthropologists, linguists, and Indigenous studies scholars to develop a body of work focused on Indigenous viewpoints that re-interrogate the history of settlement, the development of the state, and the resulting societal divides. In the last decade, there has been renewed scholastic engagement with that history, its ramifications, and efforts at reconciliation that center tribal perspectives.


For this issue of HJSR, we are interested in exploring acts of genocide and mass atrocity, and the processes of healing that have been initiated in both native and non-native communities. We seek work that evaluates acts of genocide and mass atrocity in California, long-term ramifications, impacts on culture and society, acts of memorialization and reconciliation, and the relatively slow pace or reluctance of the State to acknowledge and respond to its history.  This issue will explore the historical, contemporary, and theoretical implications of worldview collision in California. Such exploration is needed, as the larger body of work in this area has traditionally centered the State, as opposed to experiences of individual tribes and settler communities.

 

Key themes include, but are not limited to:

  • Acknowledgment and acts of reconciliation, healing, and restitution
  • Memorialization and restitution
  • Continuing logics and legacies
  • Historical acts of genocide and mass atrocity
  • Implications for Indigenous language, culture, and society
  • Ethics, philosophy, and theories of decolonizing the study and teaching about the genocide of Indigenous Peoples in California
Submission Deadline Friday, October 31, 2019

Manuscripts should be in 12-point font, double-spaced and generally not exceed 8500 words.

Commentaries and creative writing should not exceed 3000 words.

For submission details: https://digitalcommons.humboldt.edu/hjsr/