THE RURAL SOCIOLOGICAL SOCIETY (RSS)

The RSS is a professional social science association that promotes the generation, application, and dissemination of sociological knowledge. The Society seeks to enhance the quality of rural life, communities, and the environment. This website is intended to serve all those interested in rural people and places.

 

RSS Hotel Block Deadline July 15th

Please make your 2016 Annual Meeting hotel reservations now!

Conference Pricing for the Toronto Marriott Downtown Eaton Centre is found here.

Cheap, Fast, and Convenient

UP Express Train

Participants to the 79th Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society, August 7 -10 at the Toronto Marriott Downtown Eaton Centre are eligible for a reduce rate on the UP Express Train that runs between Pearson International Airport and Union Station in downtown Toronto.

All you need to get the reduced rate is show a copy of your registration confirmation for the 79th Annual Meeting.

Catch the train at Pearson International Airport get off at Union Station (65 Front St. West). You can either walk 15 minutes to the Marriott Downtown Eaton Centre (525 Bay St.) or take a short taxi ride.

For more information <https://www.upexpress.com>

ATTENTION STUDENTS!

Dear RSS Graduate Students and Recent Graduates complete the RSS Graduate Student and Early Career Survey here.    https://ncsu.qualtrics.com//SE/?SID=SV_ekBXALzWRPMatLf

It will only take a few minutes! Thank you.

Learn more about the Rural Sociological Society

POPULATION TRENDS IN POST-RECESSION RURAL AMERICA SERIES

We are very pleased to announce the inaugural brief of the Population Trends in Post-Recession Rural America series! The briefs provide information about current trends confronting rural people and their communities in the United States. The briefs present cutting edge research in a way that is useful for and accessible to policy makers, community development practitioners, local governments, community groups and organizations, and other decision-makers. 

The inaugural brief, How the Great Recession Changed U.S. Migration Patterns by Kenneth M. Johnson, Katherine J. Curtis, and David Egan-Robertson, discusses how the economic shocks of the housing-market crisis and Great Recession were associated with striking changes in net migration patterns in both rural and urban America.

Subsequent briefs will be released on a rolling basis and can be found on the series website Population Trends in Post-Recession Rural America series. Upcoming briefs will cover trends in differential health care access among rural Hispanics and how trends in age-specific migration have impacted rural areas. We will announce new contributions to the series when they are released and we invite you to check the series site often!

Current contributors are members of the W3001 project funded by WAAESD. We invite contributions from researchers examining population trends in contemporary rural America. Inquiries regarding submissions and any other questions about the series can be sent to the editorial committee at W3001@dces.wisc.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM IS NOW AVAILABLE

Old_City_Hall_Toronto_Canada

79th ANNUAL MEETING RURAL SOCIOLOGICAL SOCIETY 

UNDERSTANDING RURAL SOCIAL CLASS IN AN ERA OF GLOBAL CHALLENGE

TORONTO, CANADA

AUGUST 7-10, 2016

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TRAVEL TIPS:

You will need a current passport to travel to Canada and you may need a visa! Be sure to check with the Canadian Border Services Agency prior to making your travel arrangements.

 IRSA XIV World Congress of Rural Sociology

One-day Pass – Wednesday, August 10th

$100.00 + tax (CDN)

To register go to: https://www.eply.com/irsacongress2016

To see the World Congress Program: https://irsa2016.com/

RSS NEWS

UNH DEMOGRAPHER RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS CARNEGIE FELLOWSHIP

Kenneth Johnson, University of New Hampshire Professor has been named a 2016 Andrew Carnegie Fellow. He is among just 33 scholars nationwide  selected to receive the country’s most generous and prestigious fellowships to advance research in the social sciences and humanities.

Read the full article.