Call for Papers: HJSR Special Issue 42: California Genocide and Healing
Monday, June 10, 2019 11:39 AM

 

The Humboldt Journal of Social Relations (HJSR) invites paper submissions for the 2020 Special Issue 42: California Genocide and Healing. For this issue of HJSR, we are interested in exploring acts of genocide and mass atrocity, and the processes of healing that have been initiated in both native and non-native communities. We seek work that evaluates acts of genocide and mass atrocity in California, long-term ramifications, impacts on culture and society, acts of memorialization and reconciliation, and the relatively slow pace or reluctance of the State to acknowledge and respond to its history.  The submission deadline is October 31, 2019, and manuscripts should be in 12-point font, double-spaced and generally not exceed 8500 words. Commentaries and creative writing should not exceed 3000 words.

 

In 1979, When Our Worlds Cried: Genocide in Northwestern California by Jack Norton (Hupa/Cherokee) was published, it was one of the few monographs that centered on California Indian genocide. Norton’s work set the stage for future research by historians, sociologists, anthropologists, linguists, and Indigenous studies scholars to develop a body of work focused on Indigenous viewpoints that re-interrogate the history of settlement, the development of the state, and the resulting societal divides. In the last decade, there has been renewed scholastic engagement with that history, its ramifications, and efforts at reconciliation that center tribal perspectives.


For this issue of HJSR, we are interested in exploring acts of genocide and mass atrocity, and the processes of healing that have been initiated in both native and non-native communities. We seek work that evaluates acts of genocide and mass atrocity in California, long-term ramifications, impacts on culture and society, acts of memorialization and reconciliation, and the relatively slow pace or reluctance of the State to acknowledge and respond to its history.  This issue will explore the historical, contemporary, and theoretical implications of worldview collision in California. Such exploration is needed, as the larger body of work in this area has traditionally centered the State, as opposed to experiences of individual tribes and settler communities.

 

Key themes include, but are not limited to:

  • Acknowledgment and acts of reconciliation, healing, and restitution
  • Memorialization and restitution
  • Continuing logics and legacies
  • Historical acts of genocide and mass atrocity
  • Implications for Indigenous language, culture, and society
  • Ethics, philosophy, and theories of decolonizing the study and teaching about the genocide of Indigenous Peoples in California
Submission Deadline Friday, October 31, 2019

Manuscripts should be in 12-point font, double-spaced and generally not exceed 8500 words.

Commentaries and creative writing should not exceed 3000 words.

For submission details: https://digitalcommons.humboldt.edu/hjsr/